Women Worldwide with Deirdre Breakenridge

How do you consume video? Do you mostly watch network TV? Have you ditched the cable box in favor of digital-only companies like Netflix and Hulu? Or maybe you exclusively take in short-form clips online through social sites like YouTube, Facebook, or Snapchat. No matter how you watch video, you can bet it’s different from how you did it 10 years ago. The landscape is changing.


Joining me on the show today is Liza Glucoft. Liza is a senior digital content creator, showrunner, producer, and director with nearly 10 years experience. She has been at the forefront of a lot of different digital companies, from FX to Who, What, Where to PopSugar and Conde Nast. She’s now the Executive Producer of Programming at AwesomenessTV.


Listen as Liza shares her insights into the transformation of the video content landscape, how younger audiences consume content, and finally, how women can support one another and build each other up professionally.


In This Episode

  • How the video landscape has evolved in recent years
  • Gen Z’s content preferences
  • How female producers can lift up the generations coming after them
  • Ways to stay on top of your work when it has a hundred moving parts
  • Important characteristics for members of a high-functioning team


Quotes in This Episode

“Digital is in full force now so it's nice. It's nice to be in a place where people are recognizing now that this is the way people consume content.” —Liza Glucoft


“[Young audiences] are more concerned with feeling like a part of the experience and feeling like what they're watching is authentic and not staged and set up.” —Liza Glucoft


“Women are realizing they can be boss bitches or whatever it is, girl bosses, but there is this final top layer that's almost impossible to penetrate. And it's tough.” —Liza Glucoft


“That is so important to me, us all helping each other and helping younger women find their voice too. That's one of the most fulfilling parts of my job now is… there are some younger female producers I work with, and I feel like I get to help them find their voice in a way maybe a male producer couldn't do.” —Liza Glucoft


“People just get scared of failure. They get scared someone's going to get mad at them… I think changing the dialogue for people and making them feel more empowered [is important] because, honestly, men don't apologize all the time. They don't feel the need to be like, ‘Oh sorry. I messed up.’” —Liza Glucoft




AwesomenessTV on YouTube

Liza Glucoft on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Instagram

Direct download: LizaGlucoftonWomenWorldwide.mp3
Category:Business -- posted at: 7:44pm EDT

Who doesn’t wish they could give back more to their community? But getting started and making a habit of it can be really difficult. That’s why today we’re talking about women and philanthropy.


Wendy Steele is the founder of Generosity Matters. Through her own experiences with giving back to her community, she has come to understand the impact of generosity and has been encouraging philanthropy for most of her adult life. In 2001, she launched Impact 100, a foundation that brings transformational grants to the communities it serves across five broad focus areas: Culture, Education, Environment, Family, and Health & Wellness.


Hear the story of how Wendy is making it easier than ever for women to build up the communities around them, plus her advice for fellow entrepreneurs trying to do it all.


In This Episode

  • The personal story behind Impact 100
  • How “stop and think” gifts engage community members
  • Struggles all powerful women face
  • Tips and tools for managing stress
  • The key to making networking more enjoyable


Quotes in This Episode

“As women, we love to say that we give 110% to everything we do.” —Wendy Steele


“When you're happy and fully engaged in the work you do, you're happy and fully engaged when you're home, too… They feed each other.” —Wendy Steele


“If you are in the habit of continuously learning, you will continuously learn. If you're in the habit of being focused, and setting goals and attaining them, you just do it.” —Wendy Steele


“All of us, what I call high-capacity women, women who are out there running on all cylinders and trying to do what we do to make the world a better place, it can be hard for us, especially as leaders and solution providers, to ever raise our hand and even admit that we have stress, or that we need a break or we need to do something for ourselves.” —Wendy Steele


“You've got to have a place where you can be real, and sometimes real isn't pretty or perfect, or well put together. Sometimes real is bumpy and uncomfortable, but it's important.” —Wendy Steele



Generosity Matters

Impact 100 Council

Connect with Wendy on Twitter


Direct download: WendySteeleonWomenWorldwide.mp3
Category:Business -- posted at: 9:34am EDT

Let’s talk about leadership. Whether you’re an entrepreneur, a manager of a single department, or even a solopreneur: you’re leading someone. Are you leading your company or your teams effectively? Are you taking a holistic strategy to operating your business efficiently?


After spending over 20 years working as an executive for HGTV, Traci Barrett was looking for a career change. She decided to merge all the skills she had spent two decades developing: leading, strategizing, managing, and mentoring. Together with her husband, she started an executive coaching and consulting firm called Navigate the Journey. Navigate the Journey helps individuals and organizations discover their motivations and strengths, build their leadership skills, strategize on cultivating business, and, ultimately, realize their full potential.


Tune in to this episode to hear what skills and traits all great leaders need to carry in their back pockets, advice for how women can become more confident leaders, and the importance of identifying and naming your management blind spots.


In This Episode

  • Why leaders can benefit from consultation and training
  • How to identify your blind spots
  • Skills that help you become a more balanced leader
  • Tips for women who want to become more confident in the boardroom
  • How to gain perspective in both your personal and professional life


Quotes in This Episode

“Everybody has a blind spot. If you don't think you have a blind spot, that's probably your blind spot. All of us have something to work on and to learn.” —Traci Barrett


“Sometimes people get nervous and think that, oh [empathy] means weakness. It doesn't mean weakness. It just means putting yourself in other people's shoes, understanding how they're feeling, and acknowledging that.” —Traci Barrett


“What I always encourage women to do is: Just don't try to be anything else but yourself. Don't try to be a man. Don't try to be what you think your boss should want you to be. Just show up, and participate by being thoughtful and smart.” —Traci Barrett


“Understand what your own personal purpose and mission are and what your vision is for your life and how you plan on getting there—before you start digging into your own company. You want to have that purpose across all domains of your life personally, professionally, and with your family.” —Traci Barrett


“Our opportunity to learn and grow is greater than it has ever been, and most of it's free. I think: Take advantage of that. If you're not creating time and space to learn as a leader, it's really a shame. We should be carving time out of our day to learn every day.” —Traci Barrett



Navigate the Journey


Direct download: TraciBarrettonWomenWorldwide.mp3
Category:Business -- posted at: 1:30am EDT

Today on Women Worldwide, I’d like to discuss the challenges that come from change. Change is a constant in the life of an entrepreneur, and with change comes ambiguity, surprises, personal fears—sometimes it can really feel as if you’ve been upended.


Our guest Kristina DiPalo is the founder and driving force behind DailyWorkLife. Having worked in corporate America for many years, first in financial services, then in pharmaceuticals and HR, Kristina finally launched her own consulting firm, Elysian Communications, in 2011. Her firm focuses on two main objectives: helping companies deal with big change and helping leaders become better reflections of their true selves through coaching.


Follow along as Kristina shares the personal truths all entrepreneurs must understand, why women leaders need built up in business more than ever, and how her own personal career has been one of happy accidents.


In This Episode

  • How gender differences affect politics, company cultures, and the way we communicate
  • The dangers of supporting a business-first or business-only culture
  • Why we need to empower more women leaders
  • The unique challenges of being a solopreneur
  • Questions all entrepreneurs must ask themselves about their business


Quotes in This Episode

“There are certain social and cultural stereotypes, archetypes, that we're all ingrained in and we all follow one way or the other. There's a way that women are judged in political environments, in business environments, in social environments, that is different than the way that men are judged.” —Kristina DiPalo


“There's an incredible amount of talent that's left out of the conversation. Less than 20% of all Fortune 500 CEOs are women... Yet women are, if you look at global statistics, slightly under 50% of the global population. Half the population is really not represented, so half the ideas, half the experience, half the ability is just being left off the table. That, to me, has very broad long-term implications.” —Kristina DiPalo


“People who are entrepreneurs, or solopreneurs (to use that catchphrase): We have to give ourselves the permission to invest, even if we don't see a direct one-to-one payoff.” —Kristina DiPalo


“With each experience that I have had, I've tried to go toward work that I am curious about, something where I know that I am going to be growing and learning.” —Kristina DiPalo


“There are going to be good periods. There'll be not-so-good periods. You have to be willing to step into space that is very new and very different. It may feel kind of uncomfortable and strange at first, but also quite wonderful.” —Kristina DiPalo




Elysian Communications

Connect with Kristina on LinkedIn

Broad Influence: How Women Are Changing the Way America Works

Direct download: KristinaDipaloonWomenWorldwide.mp3
Category:Business -- posted at: 4:54pm EDT

As everyone knows, it can be incredibly difficult to find a primary care physician who has it all: someone with the time and resources to take their time to truly listen to your needs, someone who understands your ailments, with stellar bedside manner to boot.


Dr. Renee Dua is working to change that experience, both for doctors and their patients. Dr. Dua is board certified in nephrology and internal medicine, a busy working mother, and all while she's also running Heal, a new on-demand doctor house call app that's available across many cities in California and the Washington, D.C. area.


Tune in as Renee shares the experience that inspired the creation of Heal and how the return of the house call can improve the personalization of the healthcare industry.


In This Episode

  • How Heal is bringing back the art of the physician’s house call
  • The importance of preventative, comprehensive care
  • How house calls can improve the healthcare experience for doctors, too
  • Why all busy entrepreneurs need to find their village
  • The future of the health and technology landscape


Quotes in This Episode

“The idea is your doctor is here, which is wherever you are, and by that definition we can deliver access almost anywhere.” —Renee Dua


“We might go in to evaluate you for a cough or a cold, and walk out having said, ‘Well, you're due for your mammogram; you're due for your pap smear.’ Every visit should be that comprehensive. Every visit should be us actually preventing future problems because we are, again, putting your health first.” —Renee Dua


“When we thought about Heal, what we thought about was giving doctors what they needed to be their best—and a big part of that is respect and dignity and enjoying their work... Happy doctors mean happy patients.” —Renee Dua


“I hope [my children] know that I'm working on a big project that could conceivably be world-changing, and that gives me a lot of inspiration to do things. By the time my kids are my age, I wonder if we'll have hospital systems anymore. I wonder what the landscape will look like.” —Renee Dua


“We have an enormous amount of work to do. We are scratching the surface, we have to make it before we matter and I'm looking at mattering.” —Renee Dua




Download the app in the App Store or on Google Play

Direct download: DrReneeDuaonWomenWorldwide.mp3
Category:Business -- posted at: 9:13am EDT